Kaijyo

The Garden Kitchen

Inspiring knowledge through sight; the growth and storage of fresh fruit and vegetables in the city.

The concept for my design inspires a revival of ancient japanese techniques for storing
and preparing ingredients. Modular planter boxes in a variety of sizes contain soil for
planting fruit and vegetables. The glass facade allows for public to view the roots of
the plants within the soil and observe the different layers of the soil. Based on japanese
tradition, the fruit and vegetables are stored in boxes containing damp sand after they
have been picked. This method keeps them fresh without need for refrigeration. This
technique provides an energy free storage method and also allows vegetables to retain
their flavour better and for longer than they would in a refrigerator.

The notion of a modular planter box and seating system allows for the pop-up park to be
customised to work within any given site. The network of planter and storage boxes can
grow over a duration of time, with more boxes being added to the structure. The design
consists of a shallow seedling planter, a medium and large planter, a storage container,
a high and a low preperation and work bench. Seats and tables have been designed in
the same method and can be moved around easily.

Designer: Frith Armstrong

Studio: 224.401 Studio V “keeping it local” 2012

Coordinator/Lecturer: Amanda Yates
Tutor: Ant Pelosi

Design critics: Averill Clarke (WCC Council)
Invited speakers: Averill Clarke (WCC Council)